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me, joe, is that acceptable foreign policy in your mind? >> sean, look the prime minister of israel and bill clinton met at camp david with-- >> was he a terrorist. >> you can't do-- it doesn't matter whether he was or not. you have to deal with-- if you're going to have peace you have to work with both parties. you don't have to like both parties, but. >> sean: cover up the cross, but speak under a picture of arafat. >> we were meeting with abbas' on their turf, in their presidential arena and you come-- if you come to the white house, if you come to the white house and meet with our president and you don't like the fact that george washington is sitting over a desk-- >> george washington isn't a terrorist. and wait, i have a question. >> the british probably thought he was. >> sean: was he a terrorist? >> of course he was. >> sean: thank you, thank you. but the british probably thought that george washington was a terrorist. >> sean: if i was president, billy cunningham, i wouldn't speak under a picture of a terrorist. >> sean hannity we wondered what a second jimmy carter term wo
time ago to martin and dick, now director of the foreign-policy at brookings institution. for coming in. very cordial between the two men. do you think real differences remain between them over iran? but there are inevitably some differences between israel, a small country in iran posing neighborhood, and the united states, which has more than 1000 nuclear weapons in its arsenal. iran is not about to attack the united states. having said that, the president has put out a timeline of a year. mr. netanyahu has not contradicted him. and i do not think he wanted to show any difference during this visit, for sure. he does not want any daylight to show between the president and prime minister. but nevertheless, i think he has said i think it twice publicly and that allows the negotiation to be tested. >> president obama stressed resolving it diplomatically and mr. netanyahu talk about israel have been the right to independently defend itself. you think that is not necessarily conflict between those two positions? necessarily. the president said israel has the right to defend itself. his respo
of foreign policy knowledge not come out in the confirmation hearing? i don't know. let's get a simple moment, maybe something about the family. >> matt and craig live close to an open space area. we throw the balls to the dogs. we play sports with the kids. they lick kick balls, hitting baseballs. we do what grandparents are expected to do with grand kids. >> jon: do you see why you snroft i'm not suggest you don't have a wonderful and warm relationship with your family and grandchildren in these open space areas -- [laughter] -- but you need to understand that we humans -- [laughter] -- we call them parks. [ laughter ] you can't describe them as "open space areas" and expect to win elections because humans tend to vote for other humans. but in the end, sunday morning's epic battle to misconstrue basic human relationships to had to go to dennis rodman who had one form for the one family dictatorship. >> one thing i noticed about him he was very humble as a kid he's very humble. [laughter] >> jon: yes, the 28-year-old who convened this 100,000 person military parade in his own honor is the pi
. obama has the right answers to foreign policy challenges around the world. and our power player of the week. a celebrity chef combines the classic with the cutting edge. all right now on "fox news sunday." >> chris: hello again and happy st. patrick's day from fox news in washington. the president met with republicans and democrats in both the house and senate this week. but for all of the talk of a grand bar gain there was no sign the two parties are any closer to bridging the divide over our nation's debt. we want to discuss the chances for a deal with two key senators. dick durbin the senate's number two democrat joins us from chicago. tennessee republican bob corker is in chattanooga. gentlemen, while the president was meeting with members of congress, house republicans and senate democrats put out their budget plans which had dramatic differences. let's take a look at them. the gop plan would cut the deficit $4.6 trillion over ten years, all through spending cuts. the democratic plan would cut the deficit $1.8 trillion half through spending cuts and half through tax hikes.
fundamental, important foreign policy issues that you do not do at 3:00 o'clock in the morning and change the dynamics of the middle east, change the dynamics of our national security and interest. >> but is this business as usual from now on in washington? coming up, we will dissect what some are calling a, quote, carnival stage of the u.s. government. rick? >> all right. from the carnival to the weather. spring is here officially. but for millions of americans, it feels more like winter is not going away. the snow continues to fall in parts of colorado. it's part of the storm in the midwest. it could drop a foot of snow in some areas. and this storm system is on the move. it could create some serious travel problems all the way to those of us here in the northeast. meteorologist janis dean live with more. >> it's nice to see you. i'm sorry i'm delivering the bad news. >> that's okay. >> for a lot of folks, unfortunately. millions of people could be seeing another winter storm. let's take a look at it. there is our satellite imagery. heavy snow into kansas city. a warm side of the storm
spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here are the numbers -- host: send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. we will get to your phone calls in just a minute. is the us from baghdad pentagon correspondent for the washington post. begin with your headline this morning. at least 60 are killed in iraq on tuesday. what happened, and is this a pattern? guest: it has been the deadliest day since u.s. troops have pulled out. an al qaeda group took responsibility for this wave of bombings, and said it was doing so to seek revenge from the government. hearing si
started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thought that asia des
the timelines regarding iran? in covering the pentagon and foreign policy. elizabeth, you know we have a different u.s. officials have a different notion of when we reach that danger point. the testimony last week was that the ayatollah has still not made the political decision to proceed with nuclear weapons. there's not that same sense at all in israel. >> i feel like i've been talking about this for years. the different timelines. but yes, there's still a different timeline that the u.s., i think the last thing the president said was about a year, israel thinks it's sooner than that. the reality is that israel is going to be in a very difficult position to do a strike itself. we've been through that many times it doesn't have the same capabilities the united states does and the united states is it going to wait until the last possible minute there was a lot of fighting last fall as you remember, about the president not being strong enough, against on iran. that has died down. there's a new israeli government and it's a little bit more moderate. so we're still in the same place. >> a
next, house foreign affairs committee chairman ed royce talks about u.s. policy towards the asia-pacific region including u.s. relations with china and north korea's nuclear program. then former national security adviser brzezinski discusses the situation in iraq at a forum marking the tenth anniversary of the war. and later, former state and treasury department officials discuss the orange of the islamic militant -- origin of the islamic militant group hezbollah and its global terrorist threat. >> also today retired general john allen who commanded forces in afghanistan discusses the progress of the war during his command and the future mission of the u.s. and nato in the country. general allen led the forces in afghanistan for 19 months from mid 2011 through february of this year. he'll be hosted by the brookings institution, and you can see his remarks live later in this morning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on "first ladies," called a bigamist and adulterer during her husband's 1828 presidential campaign, rachel jackson chis of an -- dies of an apparent heart attac
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
accomplish? journalists and foreign policy expert a fellow at the institute of peace and wood row wilson international center joins us to talk about a few things we learned from the president's trip. first of all, you say it changed the diplomatic climate of the middle east. is that a little too optimistic? and how so? >> well, the most important thing to come out of this trip was the deal between turkey and israel. turkey is the most powerful muslim country of the 57 nations with strong muslim populations. and this makes a lot of other things possible, whether it's cooperation on syria, whether it gives the blessing to the islamic world dealings with israel, which is widely viewed as kind of an outpost of the west. so it changes the atmosphere in a lot of ways. >> robin, we always talk about the red line if you will when it comes to dealing with iran. it seemed as if at least in this trip the president successfully turned down the volume a little bit in trying to get on the same page with israel and that red line. >> well, this has been the biggest point of tension between president oba
whether it's on the road with the secretary of state or here in washington where i cover foreign policy, and that's what motivated me to write "the secretary," to sort of take a step back and digest everything i had seen and learned. i had learned a lot being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested, as you say, some of what i had seen and tried to come to some of the conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. obviously, details often matter. but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is what is happening in the middle east impacting what they're trying to do in asia? i think she had a good sense of w
: joining me martin indyk, director of foreign policy brookings institution, also a former u.s. ambassador to israel. and itamar rabinovich served as israel ambassador to the united states. at the same time he was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president i saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment buthen he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership
immigration, foreign policy, and jams in the politics lead. ♪ wireless is limitless. [ female announcer ] from finding the best way... ♪ to finding the best catch... ♪ wireless is limitless. ♪ ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> the politics lead. republican leaders in congress looking for momentum on immigration reform got a boost from senator and tea party fave rand paul. paul spoke this morning at the u.s. hispanic chamber of commerce setting a tone that reminded some of president george w. bush. >> i think the conversation needs to start by acknowledging that we aren't going to deport 12 million illegal immigrants. if you wish to work, if you wish to live and work in america then we will find a place for you. >> joining us right now for reaction to this and other news of the day of course is senator marco rubio, republican of florida. senator, thanks for joining us. what is your reaction to rand paul's announcement today? how important is this to the cause of immigration reform? >> well, first
magazine, he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls and e-mails and tweets. each morning at seven eastern on c-span. >> 70,000 people have died since the protest of bashar al-assad and syria. there was a hearing on thursday. live coverage starts at 9:45 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> 34 years ago today, we began providing televised access to the everyday workings of congress and the federal government. the c-span networks were created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you you as a public service by your television provider. >> edward demarco, the director of the federal housing finance agency testified on tuesday on the state of the housing market. and the future of fannie mae and freddie mac. this is two hours and 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> the committee will come to order it without objection. the chair has authorized recess of the committee. at any time, the chair recognizes himself for two minutes for an opening statement. i would like to start off quoting from our witnesses testimony. few of us can imagine i
funding. the same way democrats have often done on some foreign policy issues in the past with a republican president. stop the money is how you stop the law. but i think it's going to be a you have tough thing to do. it's, again, once the program gets in place, it's hard to take it back. and one of these things the governors have done when they let the federal government set up the system is that takes the states out of having any ability to set up the exchange themself. i mean, it gives the state less say and the federal government more say. that's going to be a tough thing for the republicans. you know, republicans want more say in the states. so even in times of posing obamacare, they're actually giving more power to the federal government. it's very complicated issue. of. jon: well, it is complicated, and it's three years old, and most of its provisions really haven't kicked in yet. that's what remains to be seen, how, you know, people adjust to it as they actually have to sign on for this thing. joe trippi -- >> that's right. jon: -- we'll continue to keep a watch on
, the president's approval on handling foreign policy is more or less the split 46% approve, 40% disapprove. he was in the country 11 times over the last decade. here is a sample. >> here is the main palace, the living quarters. it was struck in the first 36 hours of war. it is in this courtroom that he could face justice. he could be in this very chair on trial before the judicial system that he controlled and manipulated for 35 years. reporter: members of the iraqi government say they will likely keep the arc of victory as a reminder of just how brutal saddam hussein really was. jenna: we are so used to seeing him and not drill. >> a long time and a few pounds ago. jenna: what are your reflections? >> my first time was with secretary rumsfeld in iraq. really from 9/11 onward. on the first trip, it was in a bus like a giant fishbowl. a glass bus going down the middle of baghdad. there was not an insurgency. we didn't have jackets on as we worked through baghdad. that dramatically changed over time, as you know. it really exploded to the point surge that was implemented under general betray pet
foundation and asian studies center. when we started it 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back and asian security was all about what was happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, the study of the soviet union might have made more sense. to as we talked, we talked about the potential it could be conceivable u.s. trade with asia with equal trade across the atlantic. today it is much several times greater than that we have them blessed that over the years we have seen their remarkable economic growth and development. it is our pleasure to recognize that in terms of economic freedom as it has evolved throughout asia and pacific countries and indeed throughout the region. wheel is new our good and friends in japan and that a mutual relationship, the mutual defense treaty would be central. but we also thought asia deserved fully of broader treatment in its own right so we invested in the future. as we look ahead but those in the range of foreign and strategic and economic policy issues coming today it is hard to distinguish one fro
. when dick and i started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.-japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thou
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
is the foreign policy if not the military role of your brand in china in areas like socom. have you noticed that unity, not military, diplomatic, economic activity that both these countries quick >> the short answer is absolutely. to put a little meat on a bone, one of the things i'm supposed to be doing is making sure the united states rants apart archers of latin america. the partnership is a too late thing i you'd agree that it's very one-way now and they very much want the united states in their lives the exception of the two or three or four of them very much want the united states and allies. so we have great trading relationships, great military to military contact, but when you have an organization like the chinese come in the economically powerful, spending money, whether they're increasing infrastructure that pours, panama canal are buying everything that they want and large, large quantities. the partnership with china is very strong. they do the best they can to establish milk to build partnerships and they do pretty well on that. so that's china. on the arabian side, we've seen
's foreign policy cognizenti, can't seem to draw the obvious conclusions, stop letting these karzai guys play us as suckers and speed up our exit and stop wasting american lives and dollars. that is not very diplomatic but comes from the former head here and probably, as you probably know what a fair number of people think. is that the right prescription? in other words, he is going beyond something that you're talking about. >> it is pretty close except for some of the rhetoric because i don't think we're wasting lives and dollars there. i think we have had a mission. that mission was to remove of the taliban from control of afghanistan. and it was to try to provide the afghan security forces with the numbers and the capabilities, the skills, that they need to prevent the taliban from taking control again. that mission has, for the most part successful militarily. the part which will help to sustain it which is to have a government in afghanistan which is less corrupt, has not been as successful. but it's, nonetheless i think, going to leave afghanistan and we're not going to totally leave i
. and he doesn't understand that what that does is create a lack of trust. in foreign policy, the one thing i learned working with george herbert walker bush is that the most important thing in the world is for people to trust america and to have a feeling that america will be there in dealing with the national security issues. on both counts, this president obama has lost. >>steve: it is curious, because if you're just watching -- if you saw the president with netanyahu yesterday, you would think they're getting along great. in the past, for all intents and purposes, it seemed like they hated each other. the fact that b.b. netanyahu used to go to school with mitt romney, that didn't help things. but there is a quote today that apparently a senior israeli official said there was -- quote -- "a tacit agreement apparently between both leaders, if not coordination, to engage in a very intense public display of affection." >>alisyn: good. fantastic. if president obama's visit to israel helps them smooth over the tensions they had in the past and forge some sort of friendship, fantastic. even if
of improvement, but the unemployment rate remains elevated. the house foreign affairs committee examines of the u.s. to the syrian civil war. ben bernanke on monetary policy. a news conference with president obama and prime minister netanyahu. >> 70,000 people have been killed since protests began again syrian president assad. u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, testified at a house foreign affairs committee along with state department and usaid officials examining the u.s. response to the syrian civil war. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order to sto. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through .he street, chanting, peaceful what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. two years into that syria and uprising. years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)